Die Erwartung, D 159

Waiting

(Poet's title: Die Erwartung)

Set by Schubert:

  • D 159
    Schubert omitted the words in italics

Text by:

Friedrich von Schiller

Text written 1796.  First published late 1799.

Die Erwartung

Hör ich das Pförtchen nicht gehen?
Hat nicht der Riegel geklirrt?
Nein, es war des Windes Wehen,
Der durch diese Pappeln schwirrt.

O schmücke dich, du grünbelaubtes Dach,
Du sollst die Anmutstrahlende empfangen,
Ihr Zweige, baut ein schattendes Gemach,
Mit holder Nacht sie heimlich zu umfangen,
Und all ihr Schmeichellüfte werdet wach
Und scherzt und spielt um ihre Rosenwangen,
Wenn seine schöne Bürde, leicht bewegt,
Der zarte Fuß zum Sitz der Liebe trägt.

Stille, was schlüpft durch die Hecken
Raschelnd mit eilendem Lauf?
Nein, es scheuchte nur der Schrecken
Aus dem Busch den Vogel auf.

O! lösche deine Fackel, Tag! Hervor,
Du geist’ge Nacht, mit deinem holden Schweigen.
Breit um uns her den purpurroten Flor,
Umspinne uns mit geheimnisvollen Zweigen.
Der Liebe Wonne flieht des Lauschers Ohr,
Sie flieht des Strahles unbescheidnen Zeugen;
Nur Hesper, der Verschwiegene, allein
Darf still herblickend ihr Vertrauter sein.

Rief es von ferne nicht leise,
Flüsternden Stimmen gleich?
Nein, der Schwan ist’s, der die Kreise
Zieht durch den Silberteich.

Mein Ohr umtönt ein Harmonienfluss,
Der Springquell fällt mit angenehmem Rauschen,
Die Blume neigt sich bei des Westes Kuss,
Und alle Wesen seh ich Wonne tauschen,
Die Traube winkt, die Pfirsche zum Genuss,
Die üppig schwellend hinter Blättern lauschen,
Die Luft, getaucht in der Gewürze Flut,
Trinkt von der heißen Wange mir die Glut.

Hör ich nicht Tritte erschallen?
Rauscht’s nicht den Laubgang daher?
Nein, die Frucht ist dort gefallen,
Von der eignen Fülle schwer.

Des Tages Flammenauge selber bricht
In süßem Tod, und seine Farben blassen;
Kühn öffnen sich im holden Dämmerlicht
Die Kelche schon, die seine Gluten hassen.
Still hebt der Mond sein strahlend Angesicht,
Die Welt zerschmilzt in ruhig große Massen,
Der Gürtel ist von jedem Reiz gelöst,
Und alles Schöne zeigt sich mir entblößt.

Seh ich nichts weißes dort schimmern?
Glänzt’s nicht wie seidnes Gewand?
Nein, es ist der Säule Flimmern
An der dunkeln Taxuswand.

O Sehnend Herz, ergötze dich nicht mehr,
Mit süßen Bildern wesenlos zu spielen;
Der Arm, der sie umfassen will, ist leer,
Kein Schattenglück kann diesen Busen kühlen;
O! führe mir die Lebende daher,
Lass ihre Hand, die zärtliche, mich fühlen,
Den Schatten nur von ihres Mantels Saum,
Und in das Leben tritt der hohle Traum.

Und leis, wie aus himmlischen Höhen
Die Stunde des Glückes erscheint,
So war sie genaht, ungesehen,
Und weckte mit Küssen den Freund.

Waiting

Wasn’t that the gate that I can hear opening?
Wasn’t that the latch rattling?
No, it was the wind sighing
As it whirled through these poplars.

Oh, adorn yourself, you roof covered in green foliage,
You need to receive her, the one that radiates grace!
You branches, build a shaded chamber
In order to embrace her secretly with majestic night,
And all you flattering breezes, wake up
And frolic and play around her rosy cheeks,
When, treading lightly, the beautiful burden
Is carried by delicate feet to the love-seat.

Quiet! What is it that is slipping through the hedges
Rustling as it makes hasty progress?
No, it was just the cries of startled
Birds leaving the bushes.

Oh, put your torch out, day! Come forward,
Spiritual night, with your lovely silence!
Spread out before us the crimson-red veil,
Spin mysterious branches around us!
The bliss of love flees from the ear of the listener,
It flees from the view of curious witnesses!
It is only Hesperus, so discreet,
Who can be trusted to continue to look on.

Wasn’t that someone calling gently from the distance
Like whispering voices?
No, it is the swan, drawing a circle
Through the silver pond.

My ear can detect a river of harmony,
The spring burbles with a pleasant sound,
Flowers bend over at the west-wind’s kiss,
And I see all beings share delight;
The grape and the pear offer enjoyment,
Swelling luxuriantly they eavesdrop behind their leaves.
The air, diving into a flood of spices,
Drinks up the heat from my warm cheeks.

Aren’t those footsteps that I can hear?
Isn’t there something stirring back there in the tree-covered walkway?
No, the fruit has fallen there,
Heavy with its own fullness.

The day’s eye of flame breaks
In sweet death and its colours fade;
In the lovely light of dusk you see the bold opening
Of the sepals which hate its burning;
The moon calmly raises its beaming face,
The world dissolves into peaceful large masses,
The girdle is released by that charm
And all that is beautiful is uncovered before me.

Isn’t that something white that I can see shimmering over there?
Isn’t it glowing like silk cloth?
No, it is the glimmer of the columns
Against the dark wall of yew trees.

Oh, longing heart, stop taking pleasure
In playing with insubstantial sweet pictures,
The arm which wants to embrace them is empty;
No shadowy pleasure can cool this breast,
Oh, lead the living one here to me,
Let me feel her hand, her tender hand,
Or just the shadow of the hem of her coat,
Let the hollow dream come to life.

And softly, as if from heavenly heights,
The hour of bliss arrives,
She has approached, unseen,
And awakened her friend with kisses.



This speaker seems to be fully aware of the fact that his senses cannot be trusted. His anticipation means that all perceptions are immediately connected with his own emotional tension, and it is that time of day when the fading light means that outlines and shadows are increasingly difficult to detect or interpret and when our sensitivity to non-visual stimuli (particularly sounds and smells) becomes more acute (though because we hear unaccustomed noises we have only limited capacity when it comes to making sense of them). This combination of inner and outer pressures on perception might lead other people to pure fantasy, but this persona retains sufficient grounding in reality to be able to be conscious of his capacity for self-delusion.

Apart from the final stanza, which appears to be an ‘objective’ narrative in a different voice, the text is made up of four types of speech act on the part of the ‘speaker’: rhetorical questions in response to an external sound or movement; answers to these questions, contrasting reality with the delusion that had triggered the query; invocations or apostrophes to elements of the environment to prepare the grounds for the expected encounter with the beloved; descriptions and metaphysical evaluations of the state of nature as the sun sets and the beloved approaches.

The purpose of the questions appears to be to give the reader (or the listener if we consider the text to be a dramatic monologue) an insight into the speaker’s heightened emotional state as he waits for the beloved’s arrival. His capacity to over-interpret the physical phenomena around him as a result of his expectations suggests that he is losing control, though his ability to correct himself immediately and to reinterpret the percepts more ‘objectively’ convinces us that we are not dealing with anything too intemperate or even impolite. The setting is clearly a rather grand garden, with covered tree-walks, hedges and bowers rather than a forest. The water merely tinkles; there are no rapids or waterfalls around here.

The speaker addresses first the garden (the foliage, branches etc.), then day and night, in order to ensure that everything is ready for the encounter. By the middle of the text he has calmed down sufficiently to stop urging preparations and he opens himself up to the environment as it is. The previously unstructured sounds now become a flow of harmony. The flower blown about by the wind is not seen as a victim of violence but as a willing agent – it bows as if kissed by the wind. Instead of being subject to conflict, all things are united in bliss. The ripening fruit reflects this wholeness and signals his awareness that things are now ready; the coming encounter will be fruitful. In the penultimate reflection on the setting (beginning ‘Des Tages Flammenauge’) the poet’s inner eye adjusts to the changing light levels. As the light fades and sunlight is replaced by the pale moon an inner light transforms the scene; the less that can be perceived outwardly the more beautiful everything appears.

In the end, though, however glorious the setting might be and transcendent the experience of waiting is, the simple fact is that she has not arrived. He tells himself that he has to stop playing with all these images. The poet admits the limits of the metaphorical. He does not want the idea of the beloved, he wants her there. Suddenly, with a final half-hearted simile (‘as if from heavenly heights’) she arrives. She wakes him up with real kisses.

That seems to be that. The final line of the text offers itself as fact not dream, narrative rather than invocation. However, if she really does wake him up, does this mean that the text that is coming to an end was produced while asleep in some sense? Perhaps this vivid sense of anticipation is one of those dreams that will always seem more real to us than the rather disappointing world of ‘reality’ that most of us wake up to.

Original Spelling

Die Erwartung

Hör' ich das Pförtchen nicht gehen?
Hat nicht der Riegel geklirrt?
Nein, es war des Windes Wehen,
Der durch diese Pappeln schwirrt.

O schmücke dich, du grün belaubtes Dach,
Du sollst die Anmuthstrahlende empfangen,
Ihr Zweige, baut ein schattendes Gemach,
Mit holder Nacht sie heimlich zu umfangen,
Und all ihr Schmeichellüfte werdet wach
Und scherzt und spielt um ihre Rosenwangen,
Wenn seine schöne Bürde, leicht bewegt,
Der zarte Fuß zum Sitz der Liebe trägt.

Stille, was schlüpft durch die Hecken
Raschelnd mit eilendem Lauf?
Nein, es scheuchte nur der Schrecken
Aus dem Busch den Vogel auf.

O! lösche deine Fackel, Tag! Hervor,
Du geist'ge Nacht, mit deinem holden Schweigen,
Breit' um uns her den purpurrothen Flor,
Umspinne uns mit geheimnisvollen Zweigen,
Der Liebe Wonne flieht des Lauschers Ohr,
Sie flieht des Strahles unbescheidnen Zeugen!
Nur Hesper, der Verschwiegene, allein
Darf still herblickend ihr Vertrauter seyn.

Rief es von ferne nicht leise,
Flüsternden Stimmen gleich?
Nein, der Schwan ists, der die Kreise
Zieht durch den Silberteich.

Mein Ohr umtönt ein Harmonienfluß,
Der Springquell fällt mit angenehmem Rauschen,
Die Blume neigt sich bei des Westes Kuß,
Und alle Wesen seh ich Wonne tauschen;
Die Traube winkt, die Pfirsche zum Genuß,
Die üppig schwellend hinter Blättern lauschen;
Die Luft, getaucht in der Gewürze Fluth,
Trinkt von der heißen Wange mir die Glut.

Hör' ich nicht Tritte erschallen?
Rauscht's nicht den Laubgang daher?
Nein, die Frucht ist dort gefallen,
Von der eig'nen Fülle schwer.

Des Tages Flammenauge selber bricht
In süßem Tod, und seine Farben blassen,
Kühn öffnen sich im holden Dämmerlicht
Die Kelche schon, die seine Gluten hassen,
Still hebt der Mond sein strahlend Angesicht,
Die Welt zerschmilzt in ruhig große Massen,
Der Gürtel ist von jedem Reitz gelöst,
Und alles Schöne zeigt sich mir entblößt.

Seh' ich nichts weißes dort schimmern?
Glänzt's nicht wie seidnes Gewand?
Nein, es ist der Säule Flimmern
An der dunkeln Taxuswand. 

O! Sehnend Herz, ergötze dich nicht mehr
Mit süßen Bildern wesenlos zu spielen,
Der Arm, der sie umfassen will, ist leer,
Kein Schattenglück kann diesen Busen kühlen;
O! führe mir die Lebende daher,
Laß ihre Hand, die zärtliche, mich fühlen,
Den Schatten nur von ihres Mantels Saum,
Und in das Leben tritt der hohle Traum.

Und leis', wie aus himmlischen Höhen
Die Stunde des Glückes erscheint,
So war sie genaht, ungesehen,
Und weckte mit Küssen den Freund.

Confirmed by Peter Rastl with Friedrich Schillers sämmtliche Werke. Neunter Band. Enthält: Gedichte. Erster Theil. Wien, 1810. In Commission bey Anton Doll. [korrigierter Druck] pages 130-132; with Musen-Almanach für das Jahr 1800, herausgegeben von Schiller. Tübingen, in der J.G.Cotta’schen Buchhandlung, pages 226-229, and with Gedichte von Friederich Schiller, Erster Theil, Leipzig, 1800, bey Siegfried Lebrecht Crusius, pages 165-168.

To see an early edition of the text, go to page 130 [136 von 292] here: http://digital.onb.ac.at/OnbViewer/viewer.faces?doc=ABO_%2BZ207858202