Iphigenia, D 573

Iphigenia

(Poet's title: Iphigenia)

Set by Schubert:

  • D 573

Text by:

Johann Baptist Mayrhofer

Text written probably early 1817.  First published 1843.

Iphigenia

Blüht denn hier, an Tauris Strande,
Aus dem theuren Vaterlande
Keine Blume, weht kein Hauch
Aus den seligen Gefilden,
Wo Geschwister mit mir spielten?
Ach! mein Leben ist ein Rauch.

Trauernd wank ich in dem Haine,
Keine Hoffnung nähr ich, keine,
Meine Heimat zu ersehn;
Und die See mit hohen Wellen,
Die an Klippen sich zerschellen,
Übertäubt mein leises Flehn.

Göttin, die du mich gerettet,
An die Wildnis angekettet,
Rette mich zum zweiten Mal.
Gnädig lasse mich den Meinen,
Lass, o Göttin, mich erscheinen
In des großen Königs Saal.

Iphigenia

So, blossoming here on the shore of Tauris
Is there nothing from my dear fatherland,
No flower, is there no breath stirring
From the blessed fields
Where my sisters used to play with me?
Oh, my life has become a puff of smoke!

I stagger about mournfully in this grove,
Nourishing no hope – none at all –
That I will ever set eyes on my homeland again;
And the sea with its high waves
Being smashed against the rocks
Is drowning out my gentle pleas.

Goddess, you who rescued me
Confining me to this wilderness,
Rescue me a second time;
Be gracious and allow me to return to my people,
Oh goddess, let me appear
In the great hall of the king!



In this version of the story Iphigenia has been whisked away by the goddess Artemis (Diana) to avoid being sacrificed by her father, King Agamemnon, and is now serving as her priestess in a sacred grove on the shore of Tauris (modern-day Crimea). We join her as she laments her fate and pines for her homeland, though Mayrhofer’s original readers (steeped in such stories of the Trojan War) would have been aware of the irony. Iphigenia looks back nostalgically on the times when she used to play innocently with her sisters, but we know that those sisters are no other than Elektra and Chrysosthemis and that Elektra has just incited their brother Orestes to kill their mother (in revenge for murdering their father).

Mayrhofer’s short text is an impressive summary of the main themes of Iphigenia’s opening speech in Goethe’s play, Iphigenie auf Tauris (see below). We are in the same setting, a sacred grove by the sea with crashing waves drowning out her laments. She expresses the same (deluded) homesickness and longing for a happy family life in her father’s royal hall and an urgent desire to be returned there, by means of a second rescue.

However, the fact that Mayrhofer’s poem is a stand-alone lyric rather than the beginning of a drama changes the nature of the text radically. The scene is not being set for the arrival of Orestes and the resolution of Iphigenia’s situation. Rather we are being invited to share Iphigenia’s sense of homesickness and longing. Although we have not all been born into a royal family or been abducted by goddesses, most of us feel that we are cut off in some way. We have vague memories (perhaps fantasies) of happier times in the past and a longing to find ourselves in a situation where we are less isolated than we are at the moment. Are we really expected to give up such hopes?


Heraus in eure Schatten, rege Wipfel
Des alten, heil’gen, dichtbelaubten Haines,
Wie in der Göttin stilles Heiligtum,
Tret ich noch jetzt mit schauderndem Gefühl,
Als wenn ich sie zum erstenmal beträte,
Und es gewöhnt sich nicht mein Geist hierher.
So manches Jahr bewahrt mich hier verborgen
Ein hoher Wille, dem ich mich ergebe;
Doch immer bin ich, wie im ersten, fremd.
Denn ach! mich trennt das Meer von den Geliebten,
Und an dem Ufer steh ich lange Tage,
Das Land der Griechen mit der Seele suchend;
Und gegen meine Seufzer bringt die Welle
Nur dumpfe Töne brausend mir herüber.
Weh dem, der fern von Eltern und Geschwistern
Ein einsam Leben führt! Ihm zehrt der Gram
Das nächste Glück vor seinen Lippen weg,
Ihm schwärmen abwärts immer die Gedanken
Nach seines Vaters Hallen, wo die Sonne
Zuerst den Himmel vor ihm aufschloß, wo
Sich Mitgeborne spielend fest und fester
Mit sanften Banden aneinanderknüpften.
Ich rechte mit den Göttern nicht; allein
Der Frauen Zustand ist beklagenswert.
Zu Haus und in dem Kriege herrscht der Mann,
Und in der Fremde weiß er sich zu helfen.
Ihn freuet der Besitz; ihn krönt der Sieg!
Ein ehrenvoller Tod ist ihm bereitet.
Wie eng-gebunden ist des Weibes Glück!
Schon einem rauhen Gatten zu gehorchen
Ist Pflicht und Trost; wie elend, wenn sie gar
Ein feindlich Schicksal in die Ferne treibt!
So hält mich Thoas hier, ein edler Mann,
In ernsten, heil’gen Sklavenbanden fest.
O wie beschämt gesteh ich, daß ich dir
Mit stillem Widerwillen diene, Göttin,
Dir, meiner Retterin! Mein Leben sollte
Zu freiem Dienste dir gewidmet sein.
Auch hab ich stets auf dich gehofft und hoffe
Noch jetzt auf dich, Diana, die du mich,
Des größten Königes verstoßne Tochter,
In deinen heil’gen, sanften Arm genommen.
Ja, Tochter Zeus’, wenn du den hohen Mann,
Den du, die Tochter fordernd, ängstigtest,
Wenn du den göttergleichen Agamemnon,
Der dir sein Liebstes zum Altare brachte,
Von Trojas umgewandten Mauern rühmlich
Nach seinem Vaterland zurückbegleitet,
Die Gattin ihm, Elektren und den Sohn,
Die schonen Schätze, wohl erhalten hast:
So gib auch mich den Meinen endlich wieder,
Und rette mich, die du vom Tod errettet,
Auch von dem Leben hier, dem zweiten Tode!

Goethe, Iphigenie Auf Tauris Act I Scene 1 (1787)

Beneath your leafy gloom, ye waving boughs
Of this old, shady, consecrated grove,
As in the goddess’ silent sanctuary,
With the same shudd’ring feeling forth I step,
As when I trod it first, nor ever here
Doth my unquiet spirit feel at home.
Long as the mighty will, to which I bow,
Hath kept me here conceal’d, still, as at first,
I feel myself a stranger. For the sea
Doth sever me, alas! from those I love,
And day by day upon the shore I stand,
My soul still seeking for the land of Greece.
But to my sighs, the hollow-sounding waves
Bring, save their own hoarse murmurs, no reply.
Alas for him! who friendless and alone,
Remote from parents and from brethren dwells;
From him grief snatches every coming joy
Ere it doth reach his lip. His restless thoughts
Revert for ever to his father’s halls,
Where first to him the radiant sun unclos’d
The gates of heav’n; where closer, day by day,
Brothers and sisters, leagu’d in pastime sweet,
Around each other twin’d the bonds of love.
I will not judge the counsel of the gods;
Yet, truly, woman’s lot doth merit pity.
Man rules alike at home and in the field,
Nor is in foreign climes without resource;
Possession gladdens him, him conquest crowns,
And him an honourable death awaits.
How circumscrib’d is woman’s destiny!
Obedience to a harsh, imperious lord,
Her duty, and her comfort; sad her fate,
Whom hostile fortune drives to lands remote:
Thus I, by noble Thoas, am detain’d,
Bound with a heavy, though a sacred chain.
Oh! with what shame, Diana, I confess
That with repugnance I perform these rites
For thee, divine protectress! unto whom
I would in freedom dedicate my life.
In thee, Diana, I have always hop’d,
And still I hope in thee, who didst infold
Within the holy shelter of thine arm
The outcast daughter of the mighty king.
Daughter of Jove! hast thou from ruin’d Troy
Led back in triumph to his native land
The mighty man, whom thou didst sore afflict,
His daughter’s life in sacrifice demanding,–
Hast thou for him, the godlike Agamemnon,
Who to thine altar led his darling child,
Preserv’d his wife, Electra, and his son.
His dearest treasures?–then at length restore
Thy suppliant also to her friends and home,
And save her, as thou once from death didst save,
So now, from living here, a second death.

English translation by Anna Swanwick, 1878

Original Spelling and Note on the Text

Iphigenia

Blüht denn hier an Tauris Strande 
Aus dem theuren Vaterlande,
Keine Blume, weht kein Hauch
Aus den seligen Gefilden, 
Wo Geschwister mit mir spielten? - 
Ach, mein Leben ist ein Rauch!  

Trauernd wank' ich in dem Haine, - 
Keine Hoffnung nähr' ich - keine, 
Meine Heimath zu erseh'n; - 
Und die See mit hohen Wellen, 
Die an Klippen sich zerschellen, 
Übertäubt mein leises Fleh'n.  

Göttin, die du mich gerettet, 
An die Wildnis angekettet, - 
Rette mich zum zweitenmal; - 
Gnädig lasse mich den Meinen, 
Laß' o Göttinn! mich erscheinen 
In des großen Königs Saal!


There are a number of differences (marked in bold below) between the text that Schubert set to music and the poem printed in 1843. 
It is impossible to know if Schubert made the change when he was setting the poem or if he was working from an earlier version of the text.


Blüht denn hier an T a u r i s Strande 
Keine Blum' aus H e l l a s  Lande,
Weht kein milder Segenshauch 
Aus den lieblichen Gefilden, 
Wo Geschwister mit mir spielten? - 
Ach, mein Leben ist ein Rauch!  

Trauernd wank' ich durch die Haine, - 
Keine Hoffnung nähr' ich - keine, 
Meine Heimath zu erseh'n; - 
Und die See mit hohen Wellen, 
Die an Klippen kalt zerschellen, 
Übertäubt mein leises Fleh'n.  

Göttin, welche mich gerettet, 
An die Wildnis mich gekettet, - 
Rette mich zum zweitenmal; - 
Gnädig lasse mich den Meinen, 
Laß' o Göttinn! mich erscheinen 
In des großen Königs Saal!

Confirmed by Peter Rastl with Gedichte von Johann Mayrhofer. Neue Sammlung. Aus dessen Nachlasse mit Biographie und Vorwort herausgegeben von Ernst Freih. v. Feuchtersleben. Wien, 1843. Verlag von Ignaz Klang, Buchhändler, page 287.

To see an early edition of the text, go to page 287  [307 von 320] here: http://digital.onb.ac.at/OnbViewer/viewer.faces?doc=ABO_%2BZ17745080X